How to Pack a Light Tree Tent Setup

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Are you a person who’s often out of town exploring the great outdoors in search of another adventure? If your answer is ‘yes’, then chances are, you’re one of those who have been lugging around more stuff than they should. The truth is, camping requires mobility, so if your camping setup is bulkier than it should be, then it’s probably going to be difficult for you to get to the places where you want to go, especially on foot.

 

How to Pack a Light Tree Tent Setup

 

That’s why, if you’re searching for a convenient way to pack light or make more room for other important things, here are some tips that can help you pack the lightest tree tent setup as possible.

    • Go for a trillium hammock

      One of the heaviest parts of your camping setup is your tent. Packing the smallest and lightest tent will go a long way in minimizing the weight of your entire luggage. The trillium hammock is one of the best triple hammocks available. It’s made from durable material and is comfortable to sleep on. Assuming the weather (and the insects) are on your side, you can enjoy an incredible starry night with plenty of space to move around. However, if there’s a chance of rain or insects, you may want to go for the stingray or a connect tree tent instead.

Trillium Tree Tent
    • Learn to pitch with two ratchet handles

      Ratchet handles are among the most important pieces of equipment that you could bring on your camping trip. However, they can get pretty heavy, so learning how to pitch your tree tent using two (or even one!) will go a long way in lightening your luggage. Plus, using sturdy straps and some good knots can keep your tent in place, if you’ve found a great campsite. A site where the trees are close together will be best as you won’t need as many straps. Also, you can try to learn the bowline knot - it’s strong and sturdy but also easy to untie. Moreover, you’ll be able to fasten two corners of your tree tent with your ratchet straps, with the ratchet handle itself on the last corner. Assuming you’ve been able to keep the other corners nice and tight, the last corner will be all you need to keep your tent sturdy all throughout the night.

    • Invest in a rated daisy chain

      Want to upgrade your tent pitching skills and learn to set up your tree tent up without using any ratchet straps? Try a daisy chain. A daisy chain, also known as a monkey rope, is basically a long rope tied in a series of loops. Invest in one that is rated no less than 22kN (kilonewtons) so that you can rest assured that it won’t break on you in the middle of the night. To rig with a daisy chain, clip a Carabiner into the D ring on the corner of your tree tent. Then, wrap your daisy chain around a tree, clipping the Carabiner at the appropriate place. Do this again for the second corner of your tent. Then use a ratchet on the final corner.

Tree Tent Daisy Chain

 

  • Teach yourself to pitch anywhere

    Knowing the area where you’re planning to go camping in, even the most basic information, can be really advantageous for you. Tree tents are normally pitched on trees. Therefore, it’s quite beneficial if you’ll go and look for a site with trees that can accommodate the size and layout of your tree tent prior to your camping date. If you want to learn how to pitch anywhere and everywhere, invest some time into learning how to do so until you develop the skill to pitch on any tree, on any slope, and with any spacing. Learning this will give you the confidence to set up even at a site where you’ve never been to before.

  • Minimize everywhere you can

    You’d be surprised at how much lighter your pack can get when you minimize the little things. If you’ll be camping during the dry season when you know it won’t rain, consider leaving your rain fly at home. Opt for titanium equipment rather than heavier things. Is it warm outside? Leave your mat at home and opt for a light sleeping bag instead. This keeps your pack light while still allowing you to travel in relative comfort.





2 Trees
2 Trees

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